Nikki McClure “15,000 Years Later” at GR2

Nikki McClure GR2

Nikki McClure has a new solo show at GR2 and it looks amazing!! “15,000 Years Later” opened on April 4 and will be on view through April 22. You can also check out the show online.

Nikki McClure Giant Robot

Nikki McClure’s work echo her own cycles in life. From pre-children, to a baby, to a kid growing up, McClure captures it with paper cut pieces using an X-acto knife that are delicate and beautiful. Some pieces echo a working person’s world, others echo motherhood, and many celebrate the outdoors.

McClure has numerous published books, prints, and cards. Her annual calendar remains popular as ever. McClure once performed music and occasionally still does. She’s worked with numerous musicians and brands including Patagonia and lives in Olympia, Washington.

Giant Robot has supported her work from an early time, and it’s appeared at GR2 and in the Japanese American National Museum.

Giant Robot Presents Mari Inukai ‘Marilla Blue and Orange’

Mari Inukai Marilla Blue and Orange

On October 25, Giant Robot presents Mari Inukai‘s solo exhibition ‘Marilla Orange and Blue.’ The Marilla Blue and Orange exhibition melds two worlds of Mari Inukai. Her expressionistic portraiture is now blurring and stepping into her other world, the imaginary.

Mari Inukai kumao

Her fictional characters, a team of illustrative creatures, which are part of her canon, appear as headdresses for her portraiture subjects. Facial expressions continue to appear pensive, yet inviting us to wonder.

Mari Inukai Ringo Philosophy

Inukai’s pencil drawings continue in the same direction. ‘Marilla Blue and Orange’ will include oil paintings and pencil drawings; you can preview more of the works here.

Mari Inukai LASEIFUKU

‘Marilla Blue and Orange’ opens on Saturday, October 25 with a reception from 6:30-1opm. The show will run through November 12.

Flat Bonnie for “The World is Watching” at Giant Robot

FlatBonnie_TheWorldIsWatching_LilSquatch_Licorice

This weekend “The World is Watching” – an Exhibition of Work by Dan Goodsell, Flat Bonnie, Joey Chou, Kwanchai Moriya, Ryuca, and Tiffany Liu – opened at Giant Robot. Our friends at Flat Bonnie created 20 new pieces for this show. Many are one-of-a-kind, and all are made with animal friendly vinyl pleather, faux fur, or fleece.

FlatBonnie_TheWorldIsWatching_BatBun_Back_WesternVinylPleather_Details

FlatBonnie_TheWorldIsWatching_Jackalope1_VinylPleather

FlatBonnie_TheWorldIsWatching_Lefty_WesternVinylPleather

Check out all of the amazing pieces at Giant Robot through October 24.

Giant Robot Presents Ako Castuera “Banana Flats”

Ako Castuera Banana Flats

On September 13, Giant Robot is proud to present Banana Flats, an exhibition featuring new work by Ako Castuera. I was really impressed by “They Are Us” her last solo show at GR2, and I anticipate being awestruck once again.

Ako Castuera - Blue Lago

There are no Bananas in Banana Flats. “Banana Flats” is an idea for a place where the mind is free.

It’s a land of non-geographical dimensions, a twilight zone of creative energy where nature and imagination come into synthesis. It is an environment capable of supporting an abundance of life, impossible for us to witness from Earth except through a portal of artistic expression. Fragile but tenacious, the inhabitants of Banana Flats live all around us, in a state of lively suspension until they are channelled by a sympathetic human who will provide them with a body.

Ako Castuera Snake Lion

The exhibition “Banana Flats” is the first recorded gathering of these bodies, brought into our dimension by the sculptural exertions of artist Ako Castuera. To the average eye, they will look like colorful anthropomorphic sculptures made from a range of clays from locally dug earth to the finest porcelain. Over a time of 9 months, Ms. Castuera has provided ceramic bodies to scores of distinct entities from Banana Flats.

Ako Castuera Lions Mouth

On Earth, shadows are cast by objects. In Banana Flats, it’s the other way around. Our earth shadows project objects into an imaginary world. Our biggest shadows are cast by the abuse humans inflict on each other and on our planet. These shadows crush all kinds of life, making it seem like we are not connected, like we have broken apart and will never come together again. The clay forms from Banana Flats are opposite reactions to the big shadows of Earth. They are small, but in their humble way they have the potential to keep us connected to each other and our humanity.

“Banana Flats” opens at GR2 on Saturday, September 13 with a reception from 6:30 – 10pm. The show runs through October 1.